What were the attitudes of the British towards India and the Indians?

Indians were looked down upon by the British and Indian culture was treated as inferior to European culture. The British were ETHNOCENTRIC. Indian workers provided the British with inexpensive (cheap) labor – worked long hours, often under terrible working conditions.

What was the British attitude towards the Indians?

Many British settlers in India had contempt for the Indians and did not believe they were fit to run their own country. The British government in London favoured some measures to involve Indians in ruling India. However, they were afraid to upset their own settlers.

What was Britain’s relationship with the Indians?

While Native Americans and English settlers in the New England territories first attempted a mutual relationship based on trade and a shared dedication to spirituality, soon disease and other conflicts led to a deteriorated relationship and, eventually, the First Indian War.

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What did the British do to the Indians in India?

After oppressing India for 200 years, draining its wealth and filling their own coffers, the U.K. ripped the Indian subcontinent into pieces just before they finally left. The partition of 1947 that came along with India’s independence left nearly one million dead and 13 million displaced.

What did the British want from India?

As well as spices, jewels and textiles, India had a huge population. … They regimented India’s manpower as the backbone of their military power. Indian troops helped the British control their empire, and they played a key role in fighting for Britain right up to the 20th century.

Why did the British give freedom to India?

Due to the Naval Mutiny, Britain decided to leave India in a hurry because they were afraid that if the mutiny spread to the army and police, there would be large scale killing of Britishers all over India. Hence Britain decided to transfer power at the earliest.

What were the positive effects of British rule in India?

Positive Impact: Some positive impact of the British rule in India were the introduction of the railways, post and telegraph system for masses, introduction of Western sceinces and the English language. However, it is to be noted that the British intorduced railways for its own benifits.

What attitudes did Indians and the British have toward one another during British rule?

Indians were looked down upon by the British and Indian culture was treated as inferior to European culture. The British were ETHNOCENTRIC. Indian workers provided the British with inexpensive (cheap) labor – worked long hours, often under terrible working conditions.

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How did the British react to the diversity of the people in India?

how did the british react to the diversity of the people in India? India was home to many cultures and peoples. When the Mughal empire began to crumble, these groups could not unite to expel outsiders. Britain took advantage of this disunity by encouraging competition between rival princes.

What were the positive and negative effects of British rule in India?

What were the positives and negative effects of British rule on Indians? Positive: Improved transport, Farming methods, order justice, and education. Negative: Exploitation, destruction of local industry, deforestation, and famine.

What were the effects of British imperialism on India?

British imperialism in India had impacted the nation adversely. First of all, India’s wealth was drained to a great extent during this period. British rule in India hit the Indian economy so hard that it was never able to recover. Religious conflicts and gaps expanded.

What were the negative effects of British rule in India?

They suffered poverty, malnutrition, disease, cultural upheaval, economic exploitation, political disadvantage, and systematic programmes aimed at creating a sense of social and racial inferiority.

How did the British affect Indian culture?

The Britishers were instrumental in introducing Western culture, education and scientific techniques. … Through those means, they gave traditional Indian life a jolt and galvanized the life and culture of its people.